How Anti-Semitism Affects Central Coast Jewry

As the rate of anti-Semitism continues to grow, the Central Coast Jewish community remains vigilant. This prompted the Security Community Network, a nonprofit that oversees Jewish community security, to issue an emergency notice to synagogues across the country. On Monday, the FBI said the source “no longer poses a threat to the community.” a model, I mean, it’s a model that when there are problems in a country where people often look for scapegoats, and this has happened to Jews for centuries, ”Paula Marcus, the chief rabbi of the temple of Beth El in Aptos, said. According to the Anti-Defamation League, in 2021 there were more than 2,700 reported incidents of anti-Semitism, marking the highest since 1979. “I’m not afraid to come to synagogue though, I’m not afraid to walk around with my Jewish star,” Marcus said. Jewish community leaders say there are no known reports of anti-Semitism in Monterey or Santa Cruz County, but synagogues on the Central Coast are still planning to act. Over the past five years, the Beth El temple in Aptos has added many security measures, including a gate, a two-door locking system and cameras. Soon the temple will add rocks near from the main entrance to prevent cars from crashing into the building. The project is funded by local donations and federal grants. “It’s sad we have to do this, but I’m so glad we’re there “said Marcus. Several synagogues on the central coast dis ent intend to take advantage of federal grants to implement or improve their security measures. “There’s a Yiddish saying that hope for the best, expect the worst,” said Margaret Bruner, the cantor of Temple Beth El in Salinas. Meanwhile, Temple Beth El in Salinas hopes to defuse racial tensions by hosting an event called Miracles Without Borders: The Survival of the Findling Five in Nazi Germany. Rhonda Findling, descendant of Holocaust survivors, will share her family’s story. The event will take place on November 9, the 84th anniversary of Kristallnacht, from 7-8:30 p.m. at 1212 Riker St. with others,” Bruner said.

As the rate of anti-Semitism continues to grow, the Central Coast Jewish community remains vigilant.

The most recent widely known threat emerged when the Federal Bureau of Investigations posted on Twitter that it had probable cause for a broad threat to synagogues in New Jersey.

This prompted the Security Community Network, a nonprofit that oversees Jewish community security, to issue an emergency notice to synagogues across the country.

On Monday, the FBI said the source “no longer poses a threat to the community.”

“It’s a pattern, I mean, it’s a pattern that when there are problems in a country where people often look for scapegoats, and this has happened to Jews for centuries,” Paula Marcus, the Chief Rabbi of the Temple of Beth El in Aptos, says.

According to the Anti-Defamation League, in 2021 there were more than 2,700 reported incidents of anti-Semitism, marking a record since 1979.

“However, I’m not afraid to come to synagogue, I’m not afraid to walk around with my Jewish star,” Marcus said.

Jewish community leaders say there are no known reports of anti-Semitism in Monterey or Santa Cruz County, but Central Coast synagogues are still planning to take action.

Over the past five years, Temple Beth El in Aptos has added many security measures, including a door, a two-door locking system, and cameras. Soon the temple will add boulders near the main entrance to prevent cars from crashing into the building. The project is funded by local donations and federal grants.

“It’s sad that we have to do this, but I’m really glad we’re here,” Marcus said.

Several synagogues on the Central Coast say they intend to take advantage of federal grants to implement or improve their security measures.

“There is a Yiddish saying that hope for the best, expect the worst,” said Margaret Bruner, the cantor of Temple Beth El in Salinas.

Meanwhile, Temple Beth El in Salinas hopes to defuse racial tensions by hosting an event called Miracles Without Borders: The Survival of the Findling Five in Nazi Germany. Rhonda Findling, descendant of Holocaust survivors, will share her family’s story.

The event will take place on November 9, the 84th anniversary of Kristallnacht, from 7-8:30 p.m. at 1212 Riker St.

“In this very, very charged atmosphere that we find ourselves in, we have to learn to dialogue and communicate with each other,” Bruner said.

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