Osawatomie Public Library Receives $10,000 Federal Grant | Local News

OSAWATOMIE — The Osawatomie Public Library will receive a $10,000 federal humanities grant to help the library recover from the pandemic.

The community library was selected for the American Library Association’s US Bailout: Humanities Grants for Libraries, an emergency relief program to help libraries that have been impacted by the pandemic.

The Osawatomie Public Library plans to use grant funds to preserve and restore the history of the library and community, including the original 1912 Carnegie Library plans and the Miami County Atlas of 1901 filled with local history notes, photographs and newspaper clippings.

The grant will also help the library build its presence at the community’s annual Freedom Festival, which is a celebration of its heritage as an abolitionist colony in the days of Bleeding Kansas in pre-Civil War America. according to the press release.

“I’m so proud of our library for being part of this incredible opportunity,” said Library Director Morgan Crabtree. “This grant will truly help us emerge from the pandemic with renewed energy and focus on enriching our community through the humanities.”

Funding for the grant is provided by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) through the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021.

More than 370 libraries across the United States have applied for the grant and 200 have been awarded, according to the American Library Association (ALA).

Participating libraries, selected through a competitive, peer-reviewed application process, include public libraries, university/college libraries, K-12 libraries, and tribal, special and prison libraries, according to the release.

The recipients represent 45 states and Puerto Rico and serve communities ranging from 642 residents in Weir, Kansas, to the city of Los Angeles.

According to the release, the libraries were chosen with a focus on reaching historically underserved and/or rural communities.

“Libraries have faced significant challenges throughout the pandemic – from budget cuts to staff furloughs to building closures – especially in our communities that need them most,” said the president of the ALA, Patty Wong.

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